Building a Windows 10 IoT C# traffic monitor: Part I

We’re counting down here at FoxDeploy, about to reach a traffic milestone (1 Million hits!) , and because I am pretty excited and like to celebrate moments like this, I had an idea…

I was originally inspired by MKBHD’s very cool YouTube subscriber tracker device, which you can see in his video here, and thought, boy I would love one of these!

It turns out that this is the La Metric Time, a $200 ‘hackable Wi-Fi clock’.  It IS super cool, and if I had one, I could get this working in a few hours of work.  But $200 is $200.

I then remembered my poor neglected rPi sitting in its box with a bunch of liquid flow control dispensers and thought that I could probably do this with just a few dollars instead(spoiler:WRONG)!

It’s been a LONGGG time since I’ve written about Windows IoT and Raspberry Pi, and to be honest, that’s mostly because I was getting lazy and hated switching my output on my monitor from the PC to the rPi.  I did some googling and found these displays which are available now, and mount directly to your Pi!

Join me on my journey as I dove into c# and buying parts on eBay from shady Chinese retailers and in the end, got it all working.  And try to do it spending less than $200 additional dollars!

Necessary Materials

To properly follow along, you’ll need a Raspberry Pi of your own. Windows 10 IoT will work on either the Raspberry Pi 2B + or Raspberry Pi 3, so that’s your choice but the 3 is cheaper now.  Click here for one!

You’ll also need a micro SD card as well, but you probably have one too.  Get an 8gb or bigger and make sure it is fast/high-quality like a Class 10 Speed card.

Writing an SD Card is MUCH easier than it was in our previous post.  Now, it’s as simple as downloading the ‘IoT Dashboard‘ and following the dead simple wizard for Setting up a new device.  You can even embed Wi-Fi Connections so that it will connect to Wi-Fi too, very cool.  So, write this SD Card and then plug in your rPi to your monitor or… Continue reading

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Quick How-To: Add an image to your Raspberry Pi Windows App

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This is part of the Learning Raspberry Pi Series here on FoxDeploy.com. Click the banner for more Raspberry Pi and Windows!


One of the first things you’ll want to do when you make a GUI to push out to your Raspberry Pi 2 with Windows 10 is to make a fancy smancy GUI. To do that, you’ll need an image!

Assuming you’ve followed the guide here to make your first HelloWorld app, you might want to add an image. This will be your first image embedded in a functional app, so you’d better make it a good one! Continue reading

Super-Fast walkthrough: running Win10 Preview on Raspberry Pi 2 and what’s it like

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This is part of the Learning Raspberry Pi Series here on FoxDeploy.com. Click the banner for more Raspberry Pi and Windows!


If you’re like me, you got really excited to hear about the possibilities of running Windows 10 IoT preview on your Raspberry Pi 2.  I actually bought one just for a blog series on PowerShell and Raspberry Pi, so stay tuned for more!  Note: I did all of this while drinking some brewskies the other night.  If I can do it mildly intoxicated, then you can definitely do it sober.

What you’ll need

  • Laptop / Desktop running Windows 10 Preview, can’t be a VM as you’ll need hardware access
  • RaspBerry Pi 2:
    • Base model
    • Fancy Smancy kit – I bought this one.  You’ll really want to put a heat sink on the CPU and GPU, this thing gets super hot.  This kit includes it.
  • 8 GB or higher Class 10 Micro SD Card.  Don’t buy an off-brand or you’re begging for pain!
  • Sign-up for the Windows Connect Program here and click through all of the EULAs to enable the download tab.  Download the .zip file and unzip it.
  • Optional : SD Card reader if you don’t have one

Continue reading

Windows 10 for Raspberry Pi – Solving DISM ‘the Drive can’t find the sector requested’

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This is part of the Learning Raspberry Pi Series here on FoxDeploy.com. Click the banner for more Raspberry Pi and Windows!


Symptom

You’re like me, and super excited to start playing with Windows 10 for the Internet of Things (IoT) on your Rasperry Pi 2.  But when running the DISM commands from this post, you see the following error:

The drive cannot find the sector requested
The drive cannot find the sector requested

Reason

This is sort of a very opaque error, and in this case, double-check that you’re using a big enough SD card.  As it turns out, I accidentally picked up a 4 GB card, which is too small!  I think the specific cause of this error comes from the fact that the image in question won’t actually fit on a card smaller than 8 GB, and thus the Deployment Image Servicing Management tool craps out trying to write to that sector.

Solution

Buy a bigger SD Card!  Here’s one which will work perfectly!  When you’re buying a Micro SD card, don’t cheap out.  The quality matters and the class (the bin rate) of the card definitely matters.  Smaller cards are virtually identical to the larger capacity SD cards and the only difference is physical imperfections in the card, which can mean an earlier fail rate and other problems.